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Wednesday, November 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Superstitions of sailors found in the catalog.

Superstitions of sailors

A. S. Rappoport

Superstitions of sailors

  • 360 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by S. Paul & co. ltd. in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ocean -- Folklore.,
  • Superstition.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: 281-282.

    Statementby Dr. Angelo S. Rappoport ...
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGR910 .R3
    The Physical Object
    Pagination287 p.
    Number of Pages287
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6754729M
    LC Control Number31005601
    OCLC/WorldCa4512679


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Superstitions of sailors by A. S. Rappoport Download PDF EPUB FB2

Superstitions of Sailors (Dover Maritime) and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn moreCited by: 4. Excerpt from Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors in All Lands and at All Times Many writers on folk-lore have been consulted, and especially, as relating to the sea.

Folk-lore journal, the ety, the works of Jal. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books.4/5(4). The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Superstitions of Sailors by Angelo S. Rappoport at Barnes & Noble.

FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be : Angelo S. Rappoport. This Superstitions of Sailors (Dover Maritime) is simple bringing you can read it in the park, in the beach, train along with soon. If you did not have much space to bring often the printed book, you can buy typically the e-book.

It is make you simpler to read it. You Superstitions of sailors book save typically the book in your smart phone. Legends and superstitions of the sea and of sailors by Bassett, Fletcher. [from old catalog] Publication date Publisher [n.p.] Collection library_of_congress; americana Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress Contributor The Library of Congress Language English.

Notes. The gutters in this book are very tight,text are in the gutters Pages:   Sailing superstitions have long been passed along by word of mouth or have been mentioned time and again in movies and books. Following are 13 superstitions that occasionally still find mention amongst sailors today.

Sometime in the 19th century, the Royal Navy attempted to finally dispel the old superstition among sailors that beginning a voyage on a Friday was certain to bring bad luck. Harbingers Superstitions of sailors book Doom. Flowers are for funerals, and therefore weren’t welcomed aboard ship.

If somebody’s sweetheart brought some aboard as a bon voyage gift, they were quickly thrown overboard. Clergy weren’t welcomed either, for the same connection with funerals, but they weren’t tossed off the ship. While some of these superstitions sway more towards the nonsensical than others, it is still fascinating to see what sailors of the past thought would harm them if they weren’t careful.

It’s also wonderful to see how much we’ve grown past these superstitions (even if some took a bit longer than they should have – I’m looking at you. A St. Christopher medal brings good luck to sailors and other travelers.

From The Moonlit Road’s page about Cajun superstitions: “To protect against the Cajun loup garou (werewolf), lay 13 small objects such as pennies, beans, or broom. Handed down from generation to generation, these intriguing maritime legends from around the globe describe a magical world beneath and above the waves.

They range from the origins of the sea, as recounted in the Mahabharata and other ancient epic. Sailors, Fishermen, and Pirates are a superstitious lot. The origins of many of these superstitions are based in the inherent risks of sailing, and luck, either good or bad, as well as portents and omens that would be given associative meaning in relation to the life of a mariner, sailor, fisherman or a Superstitions of sailors book in general.

Sailors and Their Superstitions by Julian Stockwin In my latest book THE IBERIAN FLAME the appearance of a mermaid evokes age-old fears of sirens luring sailors to their doom.

Those who followed the sea then were far more superstitious than landlubbers. For sailors of the Great Lakes, as well as sea-faring and ocean sailors, these superstitions were handed down from generation to generation, passed along by “old salts” who could read the world around them like a book, who could hear its voice, silent to most, but not to all.

Superstitions of Sailors (Dover Maritime) by Angelo S. Rappoport Free PDF d0wnl0ad, audio books, books to read, good books to read, cheap books, good books, online books, books online, book reviews epub, read.

Internet Archive BookReader Legends and superstitions of the sea and of sailors. Originally published inso the writing is somewhat odd. Enjoyable overall, as the authors tries to put as much of various myths and legends, local information - such as certain parts of Scotland think this way, other parts react this way as an example, and around the world of the sea, and everything in it.

Really interesting/5. All this thought of superstition is a result of various sailing/boating superstitions that I’ve run across in my research and readings.

Obviously, since seafaring is probably one of the world’s oldest occupations and pastimes, there’s a ton of lore [both good and bad] out there. Here’s a few I’ve found that involve bad luck for sailors.

Read "Superstitions of Sailors" by Angelo S. Rappoport available from Rakuten Kobo. Handed down from generation to generation, these intriguing maritime legends from around the globe describe a magical wo Brand: Dover Publications.

Superstitions of Sailors (Dover Maritime Series) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using to colorful instances in English literature that reflect the age-old superstitions observed by mariners and the seafaring of these stories attempt to interpret and explain Author: Angelo S.

Rappoport. Sailors believed that this will protect them and guarantee a safe return home. To sum up, there are many nautical superstitions, and these are some of the most interesting ones.

Believe them or not, they are surely entertaining and good to know. So, the next time you see a sailor throwing bananas off the ship, you will not be surprised.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rappoport, Angelo S. Superstitions of sailors. Ann Arbor, Michigan, Gryphon Books, (OCoLC)   Sailors' superstitions and mariners beliefs have always been a part of life at sea. From changing animal names, to not being allowed to whistle are just some of the often good luck charms men s: Get this from a library.

Superstitions of sailors. [A S Rappoport] COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information.

Sailors also steered clear of singing, clapping, or throwing stones into the ocean for fear it would bring about bad weather. No bananas on board Perhaps the most commonly held sailing superstition from around the world is the belief that bananas on Author: Logan Voss.

Sailors' superstitions have been superstitions particular to sailors or mariners, and which traditionally have been common around the world.

Some of these beliefs are popular superstitions, while others are actually better described as traditions, stories, lore, tropes, myths, or legends, sometimes with a Gothic fictional element.

The origins of many of these superstitions. Ten best superstitions (1) Avoid greenery in the wheelhouse, as plants seek the earth and frequently crop up at funerals. Neither are good omens for your boat and your crew. (2) Pouring wine on the deck will bring good luck, as it is viewed as an offering to the Gods.

However, an accidental spillage accompanied by a swearing fit and frantic sucking of your clip-in carpet. The Temple (Third Book in the Sir Sidney Smith Series) Martin Evans on the Marine History List posted a collection of sailors’ superstitions from the current issue of “Fishing Boats”.

Never start a trip on a Friday. Some fishermen would not sail if they passed a nun, rook, or a cat on the way to their vessel. Dark Dreams Books; Sailors Superstitions. Ghost ship Sailors Superstitions Perhaps none are more superstitious than the sailors.

Or at least, what the old sailors used to be. Rolling clouds or roaring waves means little to us on land, but in the 18th century New England, it meant bad luck. Some of them are plain ridiculous, like having an. Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors in All Lands and at All Times Fletcher S.

Bassett S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, - Folklore - pages. Books shelved as superstition: What the Moon Said by Gayle Rosengren, The Golden Bough by James George Frazer, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Eve.

The superstition likely hearkens back to the age of sail, when livestock was carried onboard ship. If a ship was lost, pigs and roosters—in or on their crates—floated free. Shellback turtle: Indicates that a Sailor has crossed the equator.

“Crossing the line” is also indicated by a variety of other themes, such as fancifully rendered. George Adamski - A Herald for the Space Brothers (Paperback or Softback). Format: Book. The Song of the Cardinal (Paperback or Softback). Helpful Rating: % positive.

superstition, an irrational belief or practice resulting from ignorance or fear of the unknown. The validity of superstitions is based on belief in the power of magic and witchcraft and in such invisible forces as spirits and demons.

Superstition 3: Dracula explains away the blue flames as local superstition; the peasants themselves are too afraid of Dracula to go out on that night.

Superstition 4: Jonathan becomes the first 'logical' Westerner of the novel to heed the superstitions when he puts the crucifix above his bed. Van Helsing and the others later use myth-based.

- We all know about the unlucky num black cats, and ladders. These are common superstitions in the United States. However, you may not be familiar with superstitions elsewhere and ones that took prevalence in days long ago.

People used to – and still – believe in some whacked out things. From which foot you’re supposed to step in dog poop with, to 21 pins. 55 of the Strangest Superstitions From Around the World.

Wait 'til you hear what some women believed about acorns. By Samantha Brodsky and Adam Schubak. Apr 9, Author: Samantha Brodsky. Or, Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors in All Lands and at All Times book.» Download Sea Phantoms Or, Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors in All Lands and at All Times PDF «Our web service was introduced by using a aspire to function as a full on the web electronic digital catalogue that gives use of.

Legends and Superstitions of the Sea and of Sailors In All Lands and at All Times (Chicago and New York: Belford, Clarke, and Co., ), by Fletcher S. Bassett multiple formats at page images at HathiTrust; US access only.

Speaking of night: in researching this post on ocean stories, we learned a few things about sailor’s superstitions. You’ve likely heard, “Red sun at night, sailors’ delight. Red sun at morning, sailors take warning.” But how about unlucky bananas.

That’s right, bringing a banana on board is meant to be bad luck. Inked sailors date back thousands of years in ancient China, and it’s believed that Captain Cook’s voyage to the Pacific Islands popularized the practice with western sailors. Once they became popular, complex systems of meanings and associated superstitions developed within sailor culture, and today the sailor’s tattoo has become popular.Sailors' superstitions have been superstitions particular to sailors or mariners, and which traditionally have been common around the world.

Some of these beliefs are popular superstitions, while others are actually better described as traditions, stories, folklore, tropes, myths, or legend.Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Legends and Superstitions of the Sea, and of Sailors in All Lands and at All Times by Fletcher S.

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